23/11/17 The Budget #42Days A #HungerStrke in protest against #UniversalCredit Day 23 Are you Taking the Piss?

Well, that was the Autumn budget – after teasing us with a variety of potential changes to Universal Credit, the chancellor, Philip Hammond finally settled on making the 42 day wait for Universal Credit into a 35 day wait for Universal Credit.

The Independent called it a ‘Screeching U-Turn’

Declaring it’ll cost the government £1.5 Billion…

To be brutally frank – no it isn’t – and no it won’t.

A cynic might say…yeah, ok, I might say this was the plan all along. Have an unacceptable 42 day wait between applying for and receiving a benefit, then generously lop 7 days off it.

Has this just been a long convoluted charade to make a 35 day wait more acceptable?

People have little choice than to throw themselves to the mercy of high interest money lenders.

Sunny, a purveyor of payday loans lends money at 1277% per annum – that’s £3709 on interest alone over a year if an under 25 person borrows the paltry £58.10 per week that they’re expecting to get once their Universal Credit comes in, over the 5 week wait.

That same sum of money can be lent to the government at 0.25%

Over that same year, the government would pay back about 73 pence in interest for that same £290.50.

This is a transfer of debt onto the people who can least afford it.

We are pushing people into spirals of debt without any hope of ever clambering out of that abyss.

People can get crisis payments, I hear you cry. Remember though, these payments are half the Universal Credit rate, and they have to be paid back.

Who gets these payments is entirely hit or miss. Some people, who rely purely on the advisors at the department of work and pensions (DWP) for this valuable information, just aren’t told about its existence. Others – many others – are told they can only have crisis payments of £29.05 a week TWICE over the 5/6 week period.

When they ask what they’re supposed to do for the rest of the time, they’re blandly told that they can go to food banks.

Bear in mind, food banks can only give you food parcels 3 times a year.

Throw benefit sanctioning into the mix, and you’ve got a perfect storm. This is where people are punished for not filling out a form correctly, or missing a meeting, usually for valid reasons.

The government tells us these are used as a last resort – but with the recent roll out of Universal Credit in Leeds, it’s been reported that 25% of people have been sanctioned for some perceived misdemeanour or other.

Article 6 of European convention on human rights, states

‘Article 6 provides a detailed right to a fair trial, including the right to a public hearing before an independent and impartial tribunal within reasonable time, the presumption of innocence, and other minimum rights for those charged with a criminal offence (adequate time and facilities to prepare their defence, access to legal representation, right to examine witnesses against them or have them examined, right to the free assistance of an interpreter).’

People are being harshly punished today. They often don’t even know who their accusers are. The DWP will tell them about the nameless and faceless bureaucrats, named THE DECISION MAKER, who hold their financial futures in their hands.

If the Draconian system is to continue, indivuals must be held to account – their names must be made public before they inflict untold financial damage on those on benefits and their families.

In other news – the hunger strike continues. Nothing has changed. People are still being arbitrarily punished by a system that is designed to do exactly that.

There has been no U-Turn. Now is not a time for political point scoring. This is a cross party humanitarian issue.

Go to your MP’s and your local councillors and tell them again this is unacceptable.

Remember – Bad things happen when good people do nothing.

Walk a Mile

Chris

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22/11/17 The first (and five star) review on Amazon of My book!

Honesty

ByAdrian Baileyon 21 November 2017

Verified Purchase

Not a literary masterpiece, but that’s the last thing it sets out to be. Its value is not in how it is written but in what it says. Be assured, though, although the review here covers some pretty serious issues, the book is a good read, with lots of smiles along the way. It has a relatively small number of ‘professional’ pages at start and end but is mainly conversational and intimate in style.

Chris set out in 2011 to walk around the edge of Britain (something he’s yet to complete). A good chunk of the book comprises his blog entries from Edinburgh, around the west coast of Scotland, Cumbria, Wirral – and the many people he meets. He set out with the belief that most people are lovely and trustworthy, and this is what he found. The walk was to highlight mental health awareness and challenge stigma. The pages at the end of the book explain how this idea blossomed into ‘Walk a Mile in My Shoes’ events across the country, backed by the charity See Me and others.

Before this, there’s a powerful, often raw account of the author’s childhood which is happy and sad, sometimes devestating, and all the signs of a nascent ‘mental’ state that is going to cause him big trouble, pain, bewilderment, shame, isolation, fear. It’s a privileged, brutally honest insight for the reader, written with intelligence and at its best concision. As part of his self-described loon personhood, it’s also very funny throughoughout without ever detracting from the seriousness. It needs to carry trigger warnings for many reasons, not least because it refers to suicidal ideation and sex abuse.

Myself, I could identify with much of Chris’s experiences; others will too but the book is a testament to the fact that there is nobody who doesn’t have mental health issues. Part of his task is to gently educate society at large, but also those who may be reluctant to deny that their distress is not, in fact, a virus. I really hope the book has a wide readership, each reader unique of course, but with a relevance to particular abstract categories such as professionals, campaigners, carers, media people, teachers – anybody whose life does, or should recognise the need for ever greater awareness of mental health. For the many who are suffering or have suffered, the book will be interesting, and for some there will be points of disagreement. The diagnosis that Chris accepts is of borderline personality disorder: there are campaigners who have had this diagnosis and are seeking to have it overturned. Chris would not want to argue with them. A central point of his mission is bringing people of all sorts of different, often opposing, views, beliefs attitudes, political orientations together, to work together to address the prejudices all of us have, a recognition that these are most often not malicious. His primary practical task is to build a ‘trickle up’ movement from individuals, groups, organisations and communities to

influence funding, resourcing, and destigmatising mental health services which are structurally embedded in state thinking in unacceptable ways.

Chris intends to resume his walk in the south west of England, but not just yet. He’s currently on a 42 days hunger strike protesting about the time the new ‘universal credit’ social security benefits system in the UK takes to reach people. As in his book, he has a strong belief that individuals can make a difference, and more so when they come together. There are interesting videos and information on the See Me Walk a Mile in My Shoes website, a good complement to the book. When I finished reading the book I felt I knew more about mental health, more about myself, and pleased to have met Chris. One of the people he met on his walk had suffered deep depression, a farmer, and he advised three approaches o mental health (and life): ‘Honesty, honesty. honesty’. I think these three words (in that order) provide a fitting distillation of the book.

You can buy the book directly from Trigger Press here P&P is free

You can also order it from Amazon in the UK and USA

Not a literary masterpiece!!! Really!! None taken – I’ll happily accept those 5 stars though

Walk a Mile

Chris

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19/11/17 I need your help. Yes YOU!

The ‘All in the Mind’ awards

If you’ve felt touched or supported by any of the following, please nominate me for this award.

The coastal walk; the #LetsWalkAMile events around Scotland; any of our training sessions; personal support/ advice; practical and theoretical advice; awareness raising and that feeling of community on social media; the walk a mile film or my video logs; the ‘Walk a Mile: Tales of a Wandering Loon’ book, or something I’ve possibly forgotten

I’d really love your support

It will help raise the profile of the whole Walk a Mile Gig

Walk a Mile

Chris

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15/11/17 Walk a Mile: Tales of a Wandering Loon – Press Release with links to order/ preorder the 📚

Walk a Mile: Tales of a Wandering Loon

Chris Young

paperback, £11.99, published 28 November 2017 by Trigger Press

Walk a Mile: Tales of a Wandering Loon is the story of how one man’s normal, nurturing childhood turned into one of neglect, alcoholism and sexual abuse following his mother’s death. His story explores how this, combined with a little faulty brain wiring, lead Chris to a severe and enduring mental illness. It is also the story of how he’s tackling mental health stigma, one step at a time.

As a kind, chatty, and good-humoured man with a zest for life and a passion for helping people, Chris Young adored his job as a social worker. But things fell apart when, in 2008, he was diagnosed with borderline personality disorder, the symptoms of which include vivid, horribly imaginative thoughts of violent self-harm, long or short periods of dissociation in which the world around him doesn’t feel real, difficulties maintaining healthy relationships and inappropriate or uncontrollable anger.

His illness brought about the end of his job, the failure of his marriage and the loss of his home.

Desperate for help, he undertook group psychotherapy and slowly learned to understand, accept, and better manage his condition.

Along the way, he realised that he wanted to give something back. His work in social care had shown that even some mental health professionals were prejudiced against borderline personality disorder. Chris Young wanted to change people’s perceptions of mental health and prove that people, no matter their background, race, age, or political affiliation, could be fabulous, hospitable, interested and interesting and eager to talk about mental ill health.

He came up with Walk a Mile in my Shoes – an awareness campaign in which he would walk around the edge of the UK, representing the edge of society, where many people with mental health problems feel they are. In the style of the Jain monk Satish Kumar, who walked from India to Pakistan in the 60’s to share his views on nuclear arms, Chris Young would make his Walk a Mile trek with no money, relying solely on the kindness of other people for food, water, shelter and compassion. He would go only with a backpack full of supplies and a head full of ‘what if’, bringing people together to discuss mental health and the issues surrounding it.

And so in 2011, 34 years to the day after his mum’s death, Chris embarked on his journey. He was joined along the way by members of the public, as well as celebrities such as Sir Chris Hoy, and the adventures shared on his blog soon captured public and media interest throughout the country.

Walk A Mile is the story of Chris Young’s struggle to reach an understanding of his own mental health,  looking back at the traumatic events leading up to his diagnosis and treatment. He also shares tales of his eye-opening, heart-warming travels around the UK, and the many wonderful people he met along the way who shared their stories.

He’s since joined with See Me Scotland, a Scottish programme to tackle mental health stigma and discrimination, to bring people together at #LetsWalkAMile events throughout Scotland to talk about mental health, literally walking a mile in each other’s shoes. He has also founded the Walk a Mile in My Shoes charity, with the aim of bringing the events to England, Wales and Northern Ireland.

Chris knows he’s not going to ‘get better’, but he is getting better at managing his condition, and he’s happy. He wants to continue the many conversations he’s started about how we can change the stigma around mental health.

Chris Young was born and grew up in Corby, Northamptonshire. After completing a degree in psychology in London, he moved to Edinburgh, where he completed a Masters in Social Work at Edinburgh University. He lived in Fife before returning to Edinburgh, and now lives in Warwickshire with his wife.

For further information, please contact Katrina Power, katrina.power@yahoo.com, 07963962538

The journey so far … 

Edinburgh, South Queensferry, North Queensferry, the Fife Coastal, Dalgety Bay, Burntisland, Kirkcaldy, Buckhaven, Anstruther, Crail, St Andrews,Tentsmuir forest, Dundee, Monifeith, Carnoustie, Arbroath, Montrose, Lunan Bay, Stonehaven, Aberdeen, Balmedie, Peterhead, Crimond, Fraserburgh, the Moray Firth, Macduff, Banff, Portsoy, Cullen, Buckie, Speyside Way, Egin, Forres and Nairn, Fort George, Inverness, The Black Isle, the Beauly Firth, Redcastle, Jemimaville, Avoch, Fortrose, Rosemarkie and Cromarty, Nigg, Tain, Dornoch and Golspie, Bora, Helmsdale Dunbeath, Wick, John o’ Groats, Dunnet Head, Thurso and Bettyhill, Tongue, Loch Eriboll, Durness, Rhiconich, Scourie, Kylesku, Unapool, Ullapool, Sheildag, Poolewe, Applecross, Kishorn, Kinlochewe, Strathcarron, the Kyle of Lochalsh, the Isle of Skye, Armadale, Malaig, Knoydart, Eigg, Arisaig, Ardnamurchan, Kilchoan, Tobermory, the Isle of Mull, Craignure,  Oban, Tarbert, Claonaig, Newton on the Isle of Arran, Brodick, Ardrossan, Glasgow, Port Glasgow, Greenock, Gourock, Wemyss Bay, Largs, Ardrossan, Irvine, Prestwick, Ayr, Maybole, Girvan, Ballantrae, Stranraer, the Mull of Galloway, Port William, the Isle of Whithorn, Wigtown, Gatehouse of Fleet, Kircudbright, Dalbeattie, Castle Douglas, Dumfries, Annan, Gretna, Longtown, Carlisle, Silloth, Maryport, Workington, Egremont, Seascale, Millom, Barrow in Furness, Peil Island, Ulverston, Morecambe Bay, Lancaster, Fleetwood, Blackpool, Latham St Anne’s, Kirkham, Preston, Southport, Formby, Liverpool, The Wirral, Birkenhead, Wallasey, New Brighton, Neston, Connah’s Quay, Wales, Prestatyn, Rhyl, Colwyn Bay, Llandudno, Conwy, llanfairfechan, Bangor, Anglesey, Caernarfon, the Llynn Peninsula, Bodermid, Aberdaron, Abersoch, Llanbedrog, Pwllheli, Criccieth, Porthmadog.

Chris will return to Porthmadog in the Spring to continue his journey around the UK.  

Links to Buy the Book

Walk a Mile: Tales of a Wandering Loon is available to preorder in the United States here

And in the UK here

The Shaw Mind Foundation and Trigger Press

Psychologist Lauren Callaghan, together with former OCD sufferer Adam Shaw, are the founders of specialist publishing company Trigger Press, which publishes a range of books about different mental health issues.

Lauren and Adam are also the founders of The Shaw Mind Foundation, a mental health charity aimed at reducing stigma of mental health problems and providing assistance to people with mental health problems and their families and carers.

A percentage from the sale of every Trigger Press book sold goes to the Shaw Mind Foundation.

http://www.trigger-press.com

http://www.shawmindfoundation.org

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14/11/17 Walk a Mile: Tales of a Wandering Loon – Press Release

Walk a Mile: Tales of a Wandering Loon

Chris Young

paperback, £11.99, published 28 November 2017 by Trigger Press

Walk a Mile: Tales of a Wandering Loon is the story of how one man’s normal, nurturing childhood turned into one of neglect, alcoholism and sexual abuse following his mother’s death. His story explores how this, combined with a little faulty brain wiring, lead Chris to a severe and enduring mental illness. It is also the story of how he’s tackling mental health stigma, one step at a time.

As a kind, chatty, and good-humoured man with a zest for life and a passion for helping people, Chris Young adored his job as a social worker. But things fell apart when, in 2008, he was diagnosed with borderline personality disorder, the symptoms of which include vivid, horribly imaginative thoughts of violent self-harm, long or short periods of dissociation in which the world around him doesn’t feel real, difficulties maintaining healthy relationships and inappropriate or uncontrollable anger.

His illness brought about the end of his job, the failure of his marriage and the loss of his home.

Desperate for help, he undertook group psychotherapy and slowly learned to understand, accept, and better manage his condition.

Along the way, he realised that he wanted to give something back. His work in social care had shown that even some mental health professionals were prejudiced against borderline personality disorder. Chris Young wanted to change people’s perceptions of mental health and prove that people, no matter their background, race, age, or political affiliation, could be fabulous, hospitable, interested and interesting and eager to talk about mental ill health.

He came up with Walk a Mile in my Shoes – an awareness campaign in which he would walk around the edge of the UK, representing the edge of society, where many people with mental health problems feel they are. In the style of the Jain monk Satish Kumar, who walked from India to Pakistan in the 60’s to share his views on nuclear arms, Chris Young would make his Walk a Mile trek with no money, relying solely on the kindness of other people for food, water, shelter and compassion. He would go only with a backpack full of supplies and a head full of ‘what if’, bringing people together to discuss mental health and the issues surrounding it.

And so in 2011, 34 years to the day after his mum’s death, Chris embarked on his journey. He was joined along the way by members of the public, as well as celebrities such as Sir Chris Hoy, and the adventures shared on his blog soon captured public and media interest throughout the country.

Walk A Mile is the story of Chris Young’s struggle to reach an understanding of his own mental health, looking back at the traumatic events leading up to his diagnosis and treatment. He also shares tales of his eye-opening, heart-warming travels around the UK, and the many wonderful people he met along the way who shared their stories.

He’s since joined with See Me Scotland, a Scottish programme to tackle mental health stigma and discrimination, to bring people together at #LetsWalkAMile events throughout Scotland to talk about mental health, literally walking a mile in each other’s shoes. He has also founded the Walk a Mile in My Shoes charity, with the aim of bringing the events to England, Wales and Northern Ireland.

Chris knows he’s not going to ‘get better’, but he is getting better at managing his condition, and he’s happy. He wants to continue the many conversations he’s started about how we can change the stigma around mental health.

Chris Young was born and grew up in Corby, Northamptonshire. After completing a degree in psychology in London, he moved to Edinburgh, where he completed a Masters in Social Work at Edinburgh University. He lived in Fife before returning to Edinburgh, and now lives in Warwickshire with his wife.

For further information, please contact Katrina Power, katrina.power@yahoo.com, 07963962538

The journey so far …

Edinburgh, South Queensferry, North Queensferry, the Fife Coastal, Dalgety Bay, Burntisland, Kirkcaldy, Buckhaven, Anstruther, Crail, St Andrews,Tentsmuir forest, Dundee, Monifeith, Carnoustie, Arbroath, Montrose, Lunan Bay, Stonehaven, Aberdeen, Balmedie, Peterhead, Crimond, Fraserburgh, the Moray Firth, Macduff, Banff, Portsoy, Cullen, Buckie, Speyside Way, Egin, Forres and Nairn, Fort George, Inverness, The Black Isle, the Beauly Firth, Redcastle, Jemimaville, Avoch, Fortrose, Rosemarkie and Cromarty, Nigg, Tain, Dornoch and Golspie, Bora, Helmsdale Dunbeath, Wick, John o’ Groats, Dunnet Head, Thurso and Bettyhill, Tongue, Loch Eriboll, Durness, Rhiconich, Scourie, Kylesku, Unapool, Ullapool, Sheildag, Poolewe, Applecross, Kishorn, Kinlochewe, Strathcarron, the Kyle of Lochalsh, the Isle of Skye, Armadale, Malaig, Knoydart, Eigg, Arisaig, Ardnamurchan, Kilchoan, Tobermory, the Isle of Mull, Craignure,  Oban, Tarbert, Claonaig, Newton on the Isle of Arran, Brodick, Ardrossan, Glasgow, Port Glasgow, Greenock, Gourock, Wemyss Bay, Largs, Ardrossan, Irvine, Prestwick, Ayr, Maybole, Girvan, Ballantrae, Stranraer, the Mull of Galloway, Port William, the Isle of Whithorn, Wigtown, Gatehouse of Fleet, Kircudbright, Dalbeattie, Castle Douglas, Dumfries, Annan, Gretna, Longtown, Carlisle, Silloth, Maryport, Workington, Egremont, Seascale, Millom, Barrow in Furness, Peil Island, Ulverston, Morecambe Bay, Lancaster, Fleetwood, Blackpool, Latham St Anne’s, Kirkham, Preston, Southport, Formby, Liverpool, The Wirral, Birkenhead, Wallasey, New Brighton, Neston, Connah’s Quay, Wales, Prestatyn, Rhyl, Colwyn Bay, Llandudno, Conwy, llanfairfechan, Bangor, Anglesey, Caernarfon, the Llynn Peninsula, Bodermid, Aberdaron, Abersoch, Llanbedrog, Pwllheli, Criccieth, Porthmadog.

Chris will return to Porthmadog in the Spring to continue his journey around the UK.

The Shaw Mind Foundation and Trigger Press

Psychologist Lauren Callaghan, together with former OCD sufferer Adam Shaw, are the founders of specialist publishing company Trigger Press, which publishes a range of books about different mental health issues.

Lauren and Adam are also the founders of The Shaw Mind Foundation, a mental health charity aimed at reducing stigma of mental health problems and providing assistance to people with mental health problems and their families and carers.

A percentage from the sale of every Trigger Press book sold goes to the Shaw Mind Foundation.

http://www.trigger-press.com

http://www.shawmindfoundation.org

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#42Days A #HungerStrke in protest against #UniversalCredit Day 13

I thought I’d start today’s blog with this – people who claim benefits aren’t other people – they’re not scroungers and skivers – it’s that government and media rhetoric that has likely led to £billions being left unclaimed each year – no, these are people – people like you – people like me – people who rightfully believe that, when they stumble, the safety net of the state will be there.

OK, it’s time to get down to the brass tacks of Universal Credit – how much do people actually get from this benefit?

Well, it’s £251.77 a month if you’re under 25 – which is £58.10 a week

and £317.82 a month if you’re over 25, that translates to £73.34 a week.

We’re being repeatedly told that people can claim for crisis payments while they wait 42 days for any money to come through.

But what does that mean? What are crisis payments?

First of all, thousands of people in this situation are completely unaware of the availability of crisis payments – it’s an absolute lottery.

Secondly, it’s important to stress that these are loans that come off any future benefits.

So what do people actually receive?

If you’re under 25, if you’re found eligible after an interview by Department of Work and Pensions staff, you’ll receive

£125.88 a month – that’s £29.05 a week – if you’re under 25, and, if you’re over 25, you’ll get £158.91 – that’s £36.67 a week

What does this mean when you’re under 25 in the UK? How far will that £29.05 take you?

Average fuel bills in the UK are £592 for electricity and £752 for gas over a year.

That’s £25.85 per week on average.

Or, let’s be generous to the government, let’s say it’s £10 for electric and £10 for gas. Although we already know that these utilities are disproportionately expensive for people on a low income, who pay using prepayment cards.

That leaves £9 for food.

What about your existing debts?

Your phone?

Your broadband that’s actually needed to apply for Universal Credit?

Heat or eat?

What would you do?

They spend all their money on cigarettes on alcohol.

‘All’ their money? How much is that exactly?

Think before you judge.

These people are you, these people are me.

It’s time to stop the rollout of this Draconian, punitive system.

I’ve found, on my hunger strike, that one of the side effects of malnutrition is that I feel the cold much more. I’m lucky, I can warm myself with the luxury of central heating and a hot bath.

People in state sponsored poverty are at real risk of hypothermia.

Hypothermia in the UK today. Let that sink in. Hypo-fucking-thermia

Think about that.

Please contact your local councillor and/ or MP to demand that we stop the rollout of Universal Credit until it’s fit for purpose.

It’s like that we’ll hear that the waiting time will be reduced to 28 days at the budget this year.

That’s nowhere near good enough.

A recent panellist on Question Time argued that we should pay people in advance, because the cost of borrowing for the government (around 0.25%) is far less than the cost to folk on a low income (anything between 50% and 1500%)

Common sense really. Pay people when they need it – not weeks afterwards.

I really believe that, together, we help our government to make that change.

Walk a Mile

Chris

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#42Days A #HungerStrke in protest against #UniversalCredit Day 8

On Monday, I went down to the Houses of Parliament to support the fine people of the Shaw Mind foundation and Heads Together as we watched a debate on whether mental health education should be made mandatory in schools. 

They had secured this debate by securing over 100 thousand online signatures – a great achievement. You can read my thoughts on the debate here

It was great to meet up with so many like minded folk, all with a story to tell, all keen to hear about what I was up to.

It was also a hard day. We met in a pub – while I had a glass of water, I watched and more importantly, smelled the fish and chips being happily devoured by the pub dwellers around me. 

My poor body, misreading the information, prepared my stomach for the scrummy munchiness of the meal – resulting in rather painful indigestion for the rest of the day. 
By the time I got back home, I was absolutely fucked. In an agitated, disgruntled state, I couldn’t decide whether lying down or sitting up, or standing up was the way ahead. 

That said, I was soon fast asleep.

I woke up yesterday, still feeling the weight of fatigue. It felt like my Duracell batteries had been replaced by those really shit ones from IKEA. 

I really had nothing in the tank. I didn’t feel unwell – just knackered. 

I understand my liver is tasked with turning my fat stores into sugars that can be used by my body. The results are much slower than the usual, eat carbs and sugars and away you go system that we all know and love. 

Today, I feel absolutely dandy – IKEA batteries fully charged and away I go. 
The thing is, I still know that I’m approaching this from a position of privilege. 

We don’t have the extra super expensive electricity that’s provided through power cards. I don’t have the fear that the electricity will run out. For many, that will have already stopped and they’ll be living under duvets while the days get darker and colder. 

It’s like something out of Dickens.
There seems to be a steady trickle of people dying because of these cuts…I can’t fathom why the life of some appear to be so meaningless to this government, whilst the deaths of others require an immediate COBRA meeting and widespread media coverage. 

I’m not suffering the astonishing boredom of poverty – I have the luxury of TV, my iPhone, I’ve got a mountain of books to read.

Imagine having none of that. You’ve got a mental health problem and you’re waiting the 42 days for something to happen.
You’ve heard from friends that the 42 days is the minimum you have to wait – you know there are some who’ve waited over 12 weeks, with still no endpoint in sight. 
I’m keeping myself safe by taking a-z vitamin pills and electrolytes, ensuring my body continues to function. A luxury that’s not available to thousands. 

I saw on Monday that the government won’t do anything without robust data. Somehow, I feel they won’t be collecting information on the devastation they’re meeting out on our fellow citizens NOW – TODAY. 

Any other information, from people in the middle of this shitstorm, their friends and family, will be marked down as word of mouth, anecdotal. 

We really need to crank this up a notch or two. For those of you who have shared this story, thank you. For those who haven’t, why not? 

Please share this and/ or the first video and/ or blog with anyone and everyone. 

Contact your local councillors and local MP’s today. Demand a pause in the roll out of this deliberately punitive system until it is fit for purpose. 

Walk a mile

Chris

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